A popular uprising as a game changer? Somalia’s fight against Al Shabab terror

In the shadow of world political events, one of the biggest offensives against terror in over a decade and a half is currently taking place in Somalia. For almost two decades, Al-Shabab, a terrorist organisation linked to Al Qaeda, has had a stranglehold on the country. International projects could not be implemented or could only…

Gender Mainstreaming in African Trade: From Conceptualization to Concretization

Women play a vital role in cross-border trade in Africa and are explicitly recognized under the SDG 5 (gender equality) and Agenda 2063 of African Union (AU) that targets a prosperous and comprehensive development of Africa.[i] Again and again, women traders face diverse non-tariff barriers (NTBs) in cross-border trade ranging from customs restrictions and confiscation…

Blind hopes for children’s participation in climate change

The 2021/2022 rainy season in Malawi will among other things be remembered by the devastating images of houses submerged in water, flooded rivers, and roads that have been cut off. All these stand out as effects of Tropical Storm Ana. The devastating effects of the storm led to the president declaring a state of National…

Launch of the Asli-Ahmed-Award

On 19th November 2022, the africanlegalstudies.blog launched the Asli-Ahmed-Award in close cooperation with the Verein für Entwicklung und humanitäre Hilfe Somalias e.V. Thanks to the gracious support of the Verein für Entwicklung und humanitäre Hilfe Somalias e.V., this award will recognize outstanding articles on issues concerning Somalia and is rewarded with a US-$ 100 financial…

A study of female circumcision in Ethiopia in view of physical integrity: A human rights violation?

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM), also known as Female Circumcision (FC) is a traditionally deep-rooted practice in East Africa. However, most countries in the world and international organisations view it as a violation of fundamental human rights, such as the right to physical integrity.Therefore, different legal frameworks trying to protect girls and women from female circumcision…

Exhumed bodies of Ethiopian Migrants in Malawi underscore the rising dangers of cross-border trafficking in Southern Africa

Two mass graves were recently discovered in Malawi containing a total of 29 bodies believed to be Ethiopian migrants.[1] It’s a tragic discovery that underscores, once again, the perils of irregular migration along what is known as the Southern Route. Each year, thousands of migrants from the East and Horn of Africa (and sometimes from…

Climate change and human rights – The significant action of Gabon in protecting human rights in a changing climate

In Africa, the significances of climate change include, among other aspects, the transformation of weather patterns, biodiversity destruction and wider occurrence of more infectious diseases. All these events, in their turn lead to food insecurity, human forced displacement, and water shortages. Marginalised and vulnerable people often experience the worst effects of climate change. They often…

“I am proud of my work, but I want to go back to school!” – Research on working children in Bukoba, Tanzania

“Every day I am working. In the morning I go to the bus station, I clean a bus, then I go to sell vegetables. I am proud of my work […] because I earn my own money. […] But I am young, and I want to go back to school.” Meshak, a 14-year-old boy living…

Debate series: “When the law is not enough: Tackling intractable problems of human rights – prospects for integrated approaches”

Dear Colleagues, The Chair of African Legal Studies at the University of Bayreuth in cooperation with Rhodes University would like to invite you to our debates series on intractable problems of human rights in Africa: Everyone’s Human Rights financed by the Cluster of Excellence Africa Multiple 26 October – 30 November 2022 from 11.00 AM…

Germany’s obligation under international law to make reparation payments to the Ovaherero for genocide

It is almost unanimously agreed upon that between 1904 and 1908 the German Empire committed genocide after today’s understanding (in the following “genocide”)[1] against the ethnic groups of Ovaherero and Nama in what today is Namibia,[2] as approximately 60,000 to 100,000 people – 80 % of the Ovaherero and 60 % of the Nama population…